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High in a tree,

way above ground

Was a big stick nest.

It was deep.

It was round.

In a cup of soft grass

were two little eagles.

They were tiny and cute

and already regal.

With a coat of soft down

and big shiny eyes

And two tiny feet

that were perfect in size.

(continue)

BIG Feet

By Karen Lippy

Illustrated by Shana Morrow

Volume 3 of the Two Little Eagles Series

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Dad Brings Home Lunch

Volume 2 of the Two Little Eagles Series

By Karen Lippy

Illustrated by Shana Morrow

High in a tree,

way above ground

Was a big stick nest.

It was deep.

It was round.

And on top of the nest,

in a cup of soft grass

Lovely Mom eagle

was teaching a class

To two little chicks,

a sister and brother

About sharing their meals

and loving each other.

(continue)

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Two Little Eagles

Volume 1 of the Two Little Eagles Series

By Karen Lippy

Illustrations by Jessica Rose St./Dobe Illustrations

High in a tree,

way above ground

Was a big stick nest.

It was deep.

It was round.

In a soft cup in the nest,

sat a beautiful bird

She was sitting on eggs

and a sound she had heard.

She'd sat through the cold

and been covered in snow,

But now a soft 'cheep'

could be heard from below.

(continue)

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If you are visiting this page, you probably enjoy watching wildlife.  Now, ask yourself, "What would I do if I found an abandoned baby bird or animal?"  What if you find an eagle with an injured wing.  Or a hummingbird that appears sick or hurt?  What about a bat? or raccoon?  a fox?

You can't bring yourself to just leave it to die a slow death.  So you call your local Game Commission or state or local park.  In all probability, they will take your patient to a private citizen who has educated themselves on the proper care. feeding and other needs these injured critters need.  They will dig into their pocket for money for medications.  They will stay up long hours insuring that the bird or animal gets what it needs WHEN it needs it.  This means they can't go to a ball game or movie or anywhere else for that matter because they probably have not only the patient you've brought them but many more from other people.

Wildlife faces many obstacles daily.  Some are natural.  Others are man caused.  So, it is nice to know that there are people out there willing to sacrifice so much to get them back out in nature after they have suffered an accident.  These people get no state or federal funding.

I have had the privilege of working with Wendy Looker of Rehabitat for several years now.  We are trying to enlarge the scope of her organization by purchasing a facility where raptors (hawks and owls) can be brought for care, treatment and release.  It would also serve as an education center about these birds.  We invite all who are interested to share in making this project a reality.

 

Donations can be made to Rehabitat, Box 105, Hanover, PA 17331

 

If you are fortunate to have a wildlife rehabilitator near you,

please ask them what they need to help them help wildlife.

 

Wendy Looker releasing a juvenile red-tail back into the wild.

ATTENTION Animal Lovers

"It's very uncomfortable in here", thought Peewee.  He had been hearing the soft voices of his parents for the past few days.  He answered back when he could.  But now he was feeling very crowded.  It was time to come out.  On his upper bill was a special 'tooth' which he would use to break out of his shell, the only home he had known until now.  When he escaped the egg, this 'tooth' would fall off as it would no longer be useful.  He struggled to break through the thin membrane that would give him his first breath of fresh oxygen.  It tore through and he began to tap and scratch the outer shell with his special tooth.  Again and again he hit it as hard as he could.  Finally a tiny hole appeared in the outer shell.  He had created the pip which announced his arrival.  Again he began to tap and score the shell with his tooth.  He turned in the shell as he tapped so that the top half of the shell began to crack open.  Slowly he worked the top part of the shell up pushing with all his might.  And then it broke open.  The egg rolled onto its side and Peewee looked up.  Standing above him was a huge eagle with beautiful brown feathers and a white head and tail.  The eagle was staring back down at him with pride.  This was his Mother.    (continue)

 

Growing Up Eagle

By Karen Lippy

Illustrations by Diane Cromer

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A Year With the Eagles

The Unseen Story of the Hanover Eagle Nest

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